The effect of game-centered exercises on motor development of overweight children with developmental coordination disorder
Poster Presentation XML
Authors
1student at Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University
2Associate Professor, Imam Hossein University, Tehran, Iran
3Assistant Prof. in Motor Behaviour, Science & Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran
Abstract
Introduction: Development coordination disorder is used to describe children who, in the absence of a neurodegenerative disease or a specific medical problem, have problems coordinating the problem with their academic and social performance. This disorder also causes weakness in the movement and is significantly interfered with daily activities of life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of game-centered exercises on motor development of overweight children with developmental coordination disorder.
Methodology: The research method is semi-experimental with pre-test and post-test. For this purpose, 50 children aged 8-12 years with overweight and developmental coordination disorder were selected and randomly assigned to two groups of experimental (n = 35) and control group (n = 15) after pre-test. The experimental group then participated in protocol 3 sessions each week during 3 months. The instrument was MABC-2 test and SPSS 21 software was used for data analysis.
Results: The results of one-way covariance analysis with a significant level of 0.05 showed that there was a significant difference between the control group and the intervention group in motor development and its sub-types, and the test group had better scores than the pre-test and the control group in the handicapped components, targeting and balancing.
Discussion: Although both environmental and genetic factors play an important role in obesity, regular physical activity is the most important factor in preventing obesity.Therefore, it is advisable to prevent the development of this disorder in overweight individuals by designing different exercises and early intervention, and have a positive effect on their motor growth.
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